David E. Simpson is a producer, director and editor who has crafted award- winning films and television for over twenty-five years. He has worked in close association with Kartemquin Films since 1997.

David’s first feature-length documentary, When Billy Broke His Head... was a groundbreaking film about disability culture that garnered major prizes at a slew of film festivals, including a jury award at Sundance and a duPont-Columbia Baton for Journalistic Excellence.

David directed Refrigerator Mothers, about a generation of mothers who raised autistic children under the shadow of professionally-promoted mother-blame. The
film won top honors at the Florida, Indiana, and Sedona film festivals and aired nationally on the PBS series P.O.V.

David produced and directed Halsted Street, USA, a multi-award-winning snapshot of America through the prism of one multi-cultural street. He co-produced and edited Forgiving Dr. Mengele -- about an Auschwitz survivor's controversial campaign of forgiveness -- which won the 2006 Slamdance Grand Jury Prize for Documentaries.

David’s 2008 documentary Milking The Rhino took a pioneering look at community-based conservation and the myth of wild Africa. The film aired nationally on PBS and has screened at dozens of festivals on six continents.

David's list of editing credits on broadcast documentaries is extensive. The most recent are Steve James' Head Games, about concussions in sports; Kartemquin's ’s A Good Man, a portrait of controversial dance/theatre director Bill T. Jones; and Judith Helfand's Cooked, which will be released in 2014.

Other edited films include the Kartemquin projects Terra Incognita, 5 Girls and Vietnam Long Time Coming; the Kartemquin/PBS series The New Americans, Percolator Films’ Beneath the Blindfold, the Emmy-nominated NOVA: Mysterious Crash of Flight 201, Frontline's Shtetl (grand prix, Cinema du Real), Living in Tall Trees for WGBH/TV Asahi-Japan, several episodes of Cold Case Files for A&E, and an episode of The People’s Century for BBC/PBS.

Before segueing to documentary work, David spent his formative filmmaking years creating widely acclaimed experimental narratives. These included Dante’s Dream, a re-working of Dante’s cosmology, which earned 1st-Place awards at half a dozen film festivals.

David was awarded a BA in Philosophy and an MFA in Filmmaking. He has taught at the University of Minnesota, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and several media arts centers. He served on numerous festival juries; and has been awarded production grants and artist fellowships by the NEA, ITVS, Illinois Arts Council and other agencies.