'63 Boycott world premieres this weekend; Edith+Eddie has Chicago premiere!

54 years in the making, '63 Boycott world premieres this weekend at the Chicago International Film Festival on October 22 at 3:30PM, alongside Kartemquin short Edith+Eddie's Chicago premiere, in a program entitled Can't Turn Back at the fest. Tickets available for purchase here. The film, the story of the ongoing struggle for racial equity in Chicago Public Schools spanning from the historic 1963 Chicago Public School boycott to the present, will have its world premiere on the 54th anniversary of the boycott. Filmmakers Rachel Dickson, Tracye A. Matthews and Gordon Quinn as well as the film's subjects will be in attendance. Continued

'63 Boycott world premieres at Chicago International Film Festival; Edith+Eddie Chicago premieres at fest

Kartemquin Films is pleased to announce the world premiere of '63 Boycott and the Chicago premiere of Edith+Eddie at the 2017 Chicago International Film Festival. The short documentaries '63 Boycott and Edith+Eddie will screen together in a program entitled ‘Can’t Turn Back’ on October 22, 2017 at 3:30PM at the AMC River East, with the filmmakers attending. Tickets available here. Continued

SLIFF honors Gordon Quinn with Maysles Brothers Lifetime Achievement Award; celebrates #KTQ50

The St. Louis International Film Festival will be honoring Kartemquin co-founder and Artistic Director Gordon Quinn with the Maysles Brothers Lifetime Achievement Award in Documentary on Sunday, November 6th. In celebration of Quinn, SLIFF will be screening a preview of the work-in-progress '63 Boycott, as well as Kartemquin classics Trick Bag and Winnie Wright, Age 11. Continued

KTQ50 Gallery Talks are Back!

From July 20th several members of the Kartemquin community will be speaking at the exhibition Kartemquin at 50: Democracy through Documentary. The Exhibition is open daily, is free to all, and will run until August 20th, and is located at Expo 72 ( 72 E. Randolph St.) The exhibition features 50 years of equipment, documents and artifacts. In a recent blog post for PBS' POV documentary strand, Heather McIntosh writes that, "centered around themes of craft, community, and change, the curated items represent the organization’s history and ideologies, not to mention documentary history more generally." Continued

Are you happy? Kartemquin night at Millennium Park will make you happy!

“Are You Happy?,” is the question asked by two young nuns roving the streets of Chicago in 1968, followed by a camera, in our classic cinema verite documentary Inquiring Nuns. Inquiring Nuns screens for free at the Millennium Park Summer Film Series on July 26, 6:30pm, as the City of Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events and the Millennium Park Foundation celebrate 50 years of Kartemquin Films with Kartemquin Night at Millennium Park. Continued

Gordon Quinn to give University of Chicago's 2016 Robert H. Kirschner, MD, Human Rights Memorial Lecture

Gordon Quinn, founder and artistic director of Kartemquin Films, will return to his Alma Mater, the University of Chicago, to give the 2016 Robert H. Kirschner, MD, Human Rights Memorial Lecture on June 2, 2016 at 6:00 PM, during the 2016 UChicago Alumni Weekend. Quinn will be interviewed on stage by Jacqueline Stewart, Professor in Cinema and Media Studies and the interim director (2015-16) of the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry. They will be discussing how preserving images of the past is critical to contemporary social justice movements, with reference to our upcoming film '63 Boycott, and other works in the Kartemquin filmography. Continued

Honoring Dr. Quentin Young

Kartemquin joins many in Chicago and beyond in saluting the life and work of Dr. Quentin Young, a noted Hyde Park physician and pioneering activist, particularly on issues of segregation and a single payer system of healthcare. Dr. Young appears in our 1975 film, HSA Strike '75, which is about a 1975 strike - the largest and longest doctors' strike in US history - protesting working conditions at Cook County Hospital, which was the only public hospital in Chicago and where he was Chairman during an era where the hospital mostly served poor and uninsured patients. While Young had advised against the strike, he did not impose any disciplinary action against his staff, and was fired. He filed a lawsuit arguing that his termination was illegal because he was not informed of why he was fired, and was reinstated a month later. Continued

Did '63 Boycott find Bernie Sanders in archival footage?

The '63 Boycott project uses the web and original archival footage of Chicagoans protesting racial segregation in 1963 to encourage discussion of the past and present of the city's struggles around racial equality and the education system. The in-progress transmedia documentary project has collected numerous testimonials through a process of releasing footage and images and asking the public to share their recollections of participation in the boycotts. But their latest find is by far the most high profile yet. Continued

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