KTQ in the Early Years: Taking On Industrial Filmmaking

A closer look at Kartemquin’s early history reveals an often forgotten period of time when the original filmmaking cohort took on industrial for-hire gigs to help support their own social issue-based documentaries and the growth of a developing organization. Co-founder and artistic director Gordon Quinn joined University of Chicago Cinema and Media studies professor and long-time Kartemquin member, Judy Hoffman (What's Happening at Local 70,HSA Hospital Strike '75,Chicago Maternity Center Story, Golub) back in April to reminiscence and reflect on the days of making these industrial films for clients such as McDonald’s and Pontiac. Continued

Kartemquin and Fandor to Jointly Release Films

Fandor, the leading curated subscription streaming service for independent and international films, announced today that they will jointly release over thirty films made and distributed by legendary Chicago documentary production studio Kartemquin Films, sixteen of which debut today. The move underscores Fandor and Kartemquin’s commitment to providing extraordinary cinema to an ever-growing audience of film enthusiasts. “I have greatly admired the remarkable work of Kartemquin Films for decades,” stated Jonathan Marlow, co-founder and Chief Content Officer of Fandor. “We are absolutely delighted to add their phenomenal documentaries to the Fandor service.” Continued

International Documentary Association to honor Gordon Quinn with Career Achievement Award

The International Documentary Association (IDA) will present its prestigious 2015 Career Achievement Award to Gordon Quinn, Founder and Artistic Director of Kartemquin Films. Gordon will receive the honor at the 31st Annual IDA Documentary Awards at Paramount Pictures' Paramount Theatre in Los Angeles on Saturday, December 5, 2015. Previous winners of the illustrious award include Robert Redford, Werner Herzog, Barbara Kopple, DA Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus, Ricky Leacock, Albert Maysles, Frederick Wiseman, Henry Hampton, Robert Drew, Michael Moore, Marcel Ophuls, Jean Rouch, Walter Cronkite, and Bill Moyers. Continued

Pullman designated National Monument; watch our film on this Chicago treasure

On February 19, 2015 President Barack Obama will officially designate the south Chicago neighborhood of Pullman as America's next National Monument, and Chicago's first National Park site. To mark this great news, we are now releasing this video online free for 2 months. It can be found, along with many other extras, on the DVD for our classic film The Last Pullman Car. Historic Pullman Factory 2011 Screening of THE LAST PULLMAN CAR from Kartemquin Films on Vimeo. Continued

Tributes to Jerry Blumenthal

Jerry Blumenthal, a great filmmaker, colleague, and friend, passed away on November 13, 2014. Tributes to Jerry Blumenthal:Rick Kogan in the Chicago Tribune: Jerry Blumenthal left lasting memories on screen and in person. "He was so, so Chicago. He was street-smart, of working-class roots, but also so worldly. You could talk to him about anything. Just a couple of days before he died we had a long talk about the Bears … and about Baudelaire." - Judy Hoffman, Kartemquin associate. Continued

Stock up on Docs!

Take part in the annual Kartemquin holiday sale! We're offering 25% of everything in our store. Just use coupon code: KTQHOLIDAY12 when you check out. We're also giving back - from now until the end of the year, Kartemquin Films will donate half of all of its sales made on Typeface DVDs and merchandise to Hamilton Wood Type Museum eviction relief fund. Last month, the museum was told it would be forced to leave it's current home in Two Rivers by the end of the year. In order to make the move, the museum must first find and purchase a new space and then pack up it's enormous collection of priceless, historic wood type - the world's largest. The museum is attempting to raise $250,000 to purchase and move to a new location. Continued

The Last Pullman Car Arrives on DVD

The Last Pullman Car is now available on DVD. Purchase it here. The award-winning 1983 documentary is about union workers fighting closure of a Chicago rail car plant. Capturing the workers’ struggle against elected officials, the Pullman-Standard Company and the national union, the 28-year-old film couldn’t be more relevant than in today’s harsh economic times. A new DVD feature shows the film’s main subjects emotionally returning to the building of the former plant to watch the film with an invited audience. One workingman from this audience asks them what lessons can he learn from their experience: “You know we have to start supporting people and the political arena that supports the working class,” one of the film’s subjects firmly answers. Continued

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